Tuesday, July 5, 2011

Tension Makes the Dance

I like stretched comparisons. So when my husband and I were practicing our lindy in the kitchen the other night, and I was paying some extra attention to the tension in our arms and torsos, I started to think about how that related to writing, too. In particular--how tension, as it does in dancing, defines the movement between two partners in a written relationship.

First up--in partnered swing dancing, we use "tension" to mean the body position of both partners, the connection between the two partners, and how the lead's movements direct the follow and the follow responds. (By the way, I use "lead and follow" not "guy and girl" because leads can be girls and follows can be guys! Plus, it's more descriptive of what the roles actually do, and it's not a gender thing--it's a dance thing.) In really good partnered dancing, there aren't "cues" to follow most of the time--where the lead places himself or herself dictates--without so much as a hint--where the follow will go. If, of course, there's good tension.

Body Position Different dances require different proper body positions--in swing, it's athletic and at the ready, more springy than erect. Both partners have to have the right posture for the dance to work at its best. What about writing? Well, if you're going to write a relationship between two characters, you need two characters. I may have just made what seems to be a "duh" statement--but how many drafts, or even published works, have you read where one of the characters doesn't stand up on his or her own? Both characters need good posture, and it needs to be right posture for the relationship. You're going to have a really awkward dance if one person is in upright ballroom position and the other is in athletic, slightly crouched lindy stance. They'll have to learn to dance together if they start out in different postures!

The Connection The connection in dance refers to the places where the lead and follow touch. Take a look at Fred and Ginger:
Their connection points are at Ginger's back where Fred's hand is, at Fred's shoulder where Ginger's hand is, and their clasped hands. The most obvious connection point is the clasped hands--you see these the most in the fancy moves, because she's going to turn under his arm and he'll appear to be leading her with that hand most of the time.

He's not. It's a lie. The strongest connection point is his hand on her back. When you have a good connection, a follow should feel like the lead's hand is glued to her back except when he wants it gone, and she'll try to keep the hand where it's supposed to be. This will direct a lot of her movement--where he goes, she goes; if he turns, she goes where the hand directs her to go, which may be away from him or with him.

So, where do your characters connect? Is is an obvious but superficial spot like the hands? If you lose your grip, the you've got no other connection. Or is it a more solid spot, allowing them to communicate and dance together? This is one place where writers often develop the relationship through the story--you see the hands only at first, but the plot reveals or creates other ways the two are connected.

One other point--with good connection, the movement is organic, borne out of the connection and the lead's movement. The lead isn't shoving or pulling the follow. So, too, with your characters--one character shouldn't feel like he or she is forcing the other (unless that's a particular issue your characters are going to have to work out).

The Tension Itself So here's the thing--you can have good posture and a great connection, but still no tension. Tension is the resistance that the partners give each other. If one person has noodle arms, you have no tension, and the lead can't tell the follow to do anything. Imagine a cooked noodle--you push on it, it just flops. On the flip side, too much tension and you'll be too stiff to communicate with. The lead can't get through to a too-tense follow, and a follow can't tell if she's being led to do anything if the lead's tension is too heavy. Imagine a piece of uncooked spaghetti--push it too much and it breaks.

So, basically, characters can't be noodles, cooked or uncooked.

To make a relationship enjoyable to read--to make it a real dance--there needs to be tension. When the lead pushes, the follow gives--a little. Not all the way. This keeps them developing the relationship--too much tension and there's no give, no keeping the reader involved in the hopes that something will develop. Too little tension and the story just folds on itself--it's a done deal before it's really begun to develop.

And one more thing...it's supposed to be fun! (See, these folks dancing at the Savoy are having fun.) Sure, any developing relationship will have its angst--dancing with a new partner means getting used to all their little nuances and learning the moves they know that you don't. You're going to bonk your follow in the head or step on your lead's toes. But if it's all head-bonks and toe steps in your story, your readers are going to get bored. They want some fun, too--not just angst.

If your favorite romantic pairing in a book, or your current WIP's characters, danced out their relationship, what dance would it be?

3 comments:

Brooke Johnson said...

Such a fun post Rowenna. I like what you have to say about the connection between two people. It makes a lot of sense, even though I know nothing about dancing. ;)

Clare S/GwT said...

Interesting post - this all makes a lot of sense!! In particular I've read books where the two characters don't both stand up, which is very annoying!

As for Quin and Fehr, the central pairing of my WIP, from my limited knowledge of dance, I'd say they'd most closely resemble the tango - lots of tension, pursuit, pushing and pulling, yet ultimately their lives are entwined, however much they and their circumstances fight it!

anachronist said...

Oh a lovely post with plenty of great comparisons - you know, teaching prospective writers to dance would be such a great exercise!

If your favorite romantic pairing in a book, or your current WIP's characters, danced out their relationship, what dance would it be?

It would be tango - passionate, sometimes slow sometimes quick, full of clashes and unexpected, dramatic movements, a dance in which both woman and man can alternatively lead and follow (tango argentino I mean). Tango tells a lot about bitterness of love and reflects real-life feelings very well. I've loved that dance since my childhood.